SPORTS MEDICINE  ·  SURGERY OF THE KNEE  ·  SURGERY OF THE SHOULDER  

Shoulder
Shoulder Instability Print

Shoulder Instability, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 1, SmallThe shoulder joint is notable in that it has the greatest range of motion of all the joints in the human body. Bony restraints to motion are minimal. Therefore, the surrounding soft tissue envelope is the primary stabilizer that holds the ball of the shoulder (humeral head) in the socket (glenoid).

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Shoulder Arthroscopy Print

shoulder, anthropathy, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, nashville, orthopaedic  sports medicine, figure 3sArthroscopy of the shoulder has become a very common procedure. It was first described by Burman in the 1930's, but has only become a useful tool in the past 20 years. In that time, innovations in camera designs and fiber optics, as well as the development of specialized tools have moved shoulder arthroscopy from a diagnostic procedure to a treatment modality. Despite the large number of arthroscopies performed each year, shoulder arthroscopy can represent a challenging case to an inexperienced surgeon.

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Multidirectional Instability Print

Multidirectional Instability, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 8C, Small

The patient with multidirectional instability usually has a large element of inferior (downward) instability in addition to anterior or posterior instability. Many of these patients have generalized laxity of their joints. Often, they have complaints involving both shoulders.

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Rotator Cuff Tear Print

Rotator Cuff Tear, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 13, SmallThe shape of the acromion can be seen on a specific X-ray view known as an outlet view. The acromion has been described as having three general confirmations: (Type I) flat, (Type II) curved, (Type III) hooked.

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Rotator Cuff Rehabilitation Print

Post Surgical Rehabilitation Protocol, Type Two - Rotator Cuff Repair (Deltoid Splitting), Medium to Large Tear - Greater than 1 cm and Less than 5 c.

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Anterior Dislocation Print

Anterior Dislocation, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 6A, SmallMore than 98% of shoulder dislocations occur in the anterior (frontward) direction. The most common cause of an anterior dislocation is an indirect force applied to the arm in which it is forced away from the body and rotated over the head. However, four percent of anterior dislocations may occur without trauma.

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Posterior Subluxation Print

Recurrent posterior subluxation is the most common form of posterior instability. Patients with recurrent posterior instability usually have a history of repetitive use rather than a specific traumatic injury. 

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Impingement Syndrome Print

Impingement Syndrome, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 6, SmallIrritation and injury of the rotator cuff are the most common shoulder problems encountered the sports medicine community. While these problems can occur after a specific traumatic injury, they are more commonly associated with repetitive use. "Wear and tear" over time leads to the development of rotator cuff symptoms in a large portion of the population as they enter their 40's and 50's. We will briefly attempt to review the main principles involved in rotator cuff disease and to outline treatment options.

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Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy Print

Rotator Cuff Tear Anthropathy, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 16B, SmallCuff tear arthropathy is a term which is used to describe the changes which occur in patients who have suffered a large tear of the rotator cuff which has gone untreated. In many of these patients, repeated corticosteroid injections have been given over the years. They may have been told repeatedly that they simply had bursitis and no further evaluation may have been given.

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© Allen F. Anderson, M.D. 2017